Tag Archives: Anarchy

More on the crisis in the Ukraine

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“Volatile” does not even come close to describing the current political landscape in the Ukraine. As of the day this post is published, President Viktor Yanukovych has taken a “sick leave” and talks have stalled; prime minister Mykola Azarov resigned on the 27th of January and the parliament voted to repeal the anti-protest laws— though the laws won’t officially be repealed until the president signs off on them.

Now again, we feature work from our comrades in the Ukraine, this time in an interview with nihilist.li: “This interview with a comrade from the Autonomous Workers’ Union in Kiev was done on January 28, 2014. It sheds some light on the events around the Maidan: the array of reasons behind the protests, their focus on the hated president, the differences to the “orange revolution”, the role of the right, the weakness of social struggles and possible scenarios.

Here, they discuss the involvement of ultra-nationalist and neo-nazi groups in the protests:

Q: Right-wing parties and fascist groups play a role in the protests. How important are they actually? Do they get much support? How do other protesters relate to them?

A: Far right party Svoboda is the most organized of the three large political forces trying to control the protest. They are the only party which has real active cells in various regions, actual activist base. So, as the most organized and the most ideological of the three, they are gaining the most. Apart from Svoboda, there is an umbrella coalition of neo-nazi militant groups. It is called Right Sector. They were formed in the beginning of the protests, and by now they’ve succeeded to gain enormous prominence and conquer sympathies from apolitical and liberal people. They are mostly famous by their demonstrative militancy and aggression, and the public doesn’t see anything wrong with these cute young patriots. Lately, the same pattern repeats in other regions, where neo-nazi football hooligans turned out to be the main assault force fighting the police and pro-government thugs.

The fascist hegemony was indisputable until January 19th, when the protests were joined by lots of other people – random apolitical citizens, liberals and even the left. That happened because the agenda of the protests shifted to repealing the “dictatorship laws” passed on January 16. Since then they had to step back a bit but nevertheless it’s obvious that in the long run these protests will enormously benefit the far right, whoever wins. In the case of the victory of the opposition, they will surely get themselves the police forces, special services etc. If Yanukovych wins, this means that half of the country will become firm supporters of the far-right as supposedly the only patriotic radical force able to confront the dictator.

Meanwhile, most left activists also joined the protests after January 19 because those laws will severely damage them as well. They found their niche in infrastructural activities, such as vigils in emergency hospitals: they stay there in order to prevent police and thugs kidnap the wounded. Other area of left activity is the above mentioned attempt at igniting the political strike.

Read the entire interview here.

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Filed under Anarchism, extremism, Nazis, Politics, Uncategorized

The Hammer Comes Down on Andrew Crossley

Filesharing will kill music, just like the radio and the phonograph did.


Know what else was in those leaked emails from ACS:Law? Lists of users of Sky Internet and their pornography purchases. This isn’t just unethical, it’s blatantly illegal. The Solicitor’s Regulation Authority hit the tip of the iceberg of corruption that makes up ACS:Law. The thuggish and mafia-like behavior of the recording industry and its “anti-piracy” cronies are developing into a distinct pattern: illegal acts are justified if you are in the employ of a multi-billion dollar industry and are targeting college students, pensioners and people with no money. The gears of capitalist greed grind on– but not for long, it would seem. What greedy band of recording industry hitmen are next?

Here is Privacy International’s announcement.

Privacy International has announced that it is planning legal action against a UK law firm for breaching the privacy of internet users after a security breach.

The information held by ACS:Law, a law firm that has been tracking internet users to pursue legal action for breach of copyright, includes vast amounts of information on thousands of internet users. While the full extent of this breach is not yet known, one report stated that among the stolen files is a single email containing the personal information of approximately 10,000 people assumed to have been involved in file-sharing of pornographic works, exposing their names, addresses, postcodes, and Internet protocol addresses. Other reports indicate that credit card details have also been made available.

According to Alexander Hanff, PI Advisor: “This data breach is likely to result in significant harm to tens of thousands of people in the form of fraud, identity theft and severe emotional distress.”

“This firm collected this information by spying on internet users, and now it has placed thousands of innocent people at risk.”

PI has briefed the Information Commissioner’s Office and is preparing a complaint. PI is also accepting complaints directly from the public, and we urge anyone who is a victim of this breach to get in touch as soon as possible by emailing alex@privacy.org.

The BBC has more.

Simon Davis, from the watchdog Privacy International, said he would be asking the Information Commissioner to “conduct a full investigation” and hoped it would be “a test case of the Information Commissioner’s new powers”.

“You rarely find an aspect where almost every aspect of the Data Protection Act (DPA) has been breached, but this is one of them,” said Mr Davies.

“It fits perfectly for the term ‘egregious misuse’ of personal data,” he added.

Crossley’s reaction has been priceless, claiming that hackers broke into his site and uncovered classified material. This is another obvious and blatant lie. During the process of ACS:Law’s website being returned to operational status, administrators foolishly published the entire email database on a public page and made no effort to conceal this from the thousands of people then scouring their site with a fine-toothed comb. Crossley shot himself in the foot and is now trying to backpedal. Lolz.

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“What I would do with $55,000: Our need for accountability and our failure to realize opportunities and build movements”


Every once in a while a really good article comes out of the movement. The kind of article that says what so many of us have been mulling around in our crazy heads, but never found the words or boldness to state it properly.

From the blog of the Four Star Anarchist Organization comes such an article

We thank them dearly for giving us the okay for reposting it via a mutual comrade.

What I would do with $55,000: Our need for accountability and our failure to realize opportunities and build movements
June 1, 2010 ·

On May 2nd 2010, I received an email in my inbox calling for “solidarity” and “emergency donations” to pay the bail of 11 self-identified anarchists in Asheville, North Carolina. They were alleged to have smashed ATMs, bank windows and small shops in celebration of May 1, International Workers’ Day. The price to bail out each of the 11 who were arrested? $5,000. As predictable as the paper-hawking of countless Communist factions at street demonstrations – anarchists locally and nationally got to work planning benefit events. Arrestee benefits are something we are always able to pull together. Yet our inability to create effective momentum, organization, and lasting impact, especially during economic and ecological crisis, is exacerbated by the fact that our “movement” allows anyone to identify as an anarchist, go on “the attack,” and turn months of potential movement-building efforts into benefit shows and talks about their actions.

I became an anarchist in the late 1990s. Since then, I’ve seen countless projects and groups fall apart due to lacking the resources and organization. Rarely do groups continue moving forward in a productive way. I started to ask myself how anarchists here in Chicago could use $55,000 to build and strengthen our movement. The numbers I use are obviously not exact. However, they point to the possibility of creating mass base movements instead of acting as an isolated political sect.

To strengthen our current movement, I would attempt to pay the rent of several existing anarchist and related projects for the year. To strengthen formal organizations and social centers I would pay Biblioteca Popular $9,600 and Locked Out $12,000; the I.W.W and Lucy Parsons Worker’s Center would get $4,300. That would leave $29,100. To strengthen community projects I would give Cop Watch $5,000 to buy new cameras, recorders, vests, and supplies for the communities that they organize in.

That would leave $24,100. I would use this money to address weaknesses in our movement, including our inability to effectively outreach and expand anarchist ideas outside of our circles. I would buy one industrial CD-R/DVD read and write drive for $1,000; a printing press for $5,000; and a screenprinting press for $8,000. This leaves a remainder of $16,100.

Opportunities that would exist outside of this budget would include buying land or buildings instead of renting. We could afford to operate a worker-managed bus program to combat the Chicago Transit Authority’s cuts and layoffs. We could fund, for an entire year, direct action worker centers throughout the Midwest. Most importantly, we could use the funds to build our capacity as organizers. We would finally have a chance to break out of being isolated militants.

This is all hypothetical, but remember that there is still $16,100 left. How would you use it to build models of anarchist resistance?

Chicago has made international headlines as being the most violent city in the United States. Not only are we the most violent, we also have 70,000-75,000 foreclosed homes in Metro Chicago. We also have the highest rates of foreclosure amongst small apartment owners, with Englewood ranking first, followed by Austin, West Englewood and then New City. Chicago’s unemployment rate hit 11.6% (which doesn’t include those who have given up looking for work). For African-American youth, the unemployment rate is the same as the unemployment rate for the general populace during the Great Depression. Do we even need to talk about the skyrocketing incarceration rate? It’s increased from 1.8 million in 2000 to 2.3 million in 2008. Furthermore, the immigrant deportation rate has doubled over a ten year period and continues to increase.

As anarchists, members of our movement are the first to cry out to build barricades, occupy buildings or even pick up arms. And yet, through labor organizing, I’ve seen workers who live in fear of writing their name on a petition for a list of demands. Clearly, we have a ways to go. To believe that we can reach a system without bosses through isolated window-smashing and “attacks” against the state is foolish. To believe that this system could defend itself against capitalists and fascists is absurd. While street fights in Greece have been very inspirational, they mainly appeal to our American love of good action movies and prime-time TV. But the insurrection isn’t the only part of their movement. We should not overlook the massive successes of Greek anarchists with organizing immigrants (particularly Afghani immigrants) in labor and social struggles.

The common person works 20 to 50 hours a week and, with limited time, spreads the remainder between family, bill-paying and personal time. Having the capacity to revolt against bosses, developers and landlords requires that we build our ability to organize and fight through continual work and dialogue with time- and money-stressed individuals. Dialogue and continual work, whether formally or informally, has the capacity to build a culture of resistance. But this method is only a revolutionary means, not an end. Take the Republic Windows occupation. During the struggle, Mexican-American workers stated that in Mexico, their union would occupy the factory when machinery was being moved. Here in the U.S, when the equipment was being removed and production relocated, they stuck with methods that they knew would solve the problem. This is important because it indicates that if you build a person’s capacity to self-organize, even using militant methods, that individual can defend their coworkers or community members – even in a new situation. We see from this example that it can not only happen across neighborhoods or industries, but also across borders.

We have to be critical of our movement and how it relates to the working class in which people of color face the most obvious blow from capitalists. Anarchists who put on ninja jammies and go on the attack in the “Berkeley” liberal town of Asheville demonstrate how cut off they are from working-class people. At a time when families are being evicted and lack work or healthcare, we have to ask: Was it really advantageous for the alleged attack against small businesses in a liberal Southern city? Thousands of families are being evicted from their homes and our response was to break an ATM? VIVA! Really? This is what we call a militant movement?

What we lack is continuous organization and participation in social struggle. This would allow us to analyze current political and economic conditions, learn from our mistakes, and build on past victories. How does informality and disorganization limit our opportunities to grow? Many of us have been involved in some sort of grassroots activity as anarchists – from food programs to prisoner support; from anti-police work to labor activity. Yet we’ve created no real “pull” or “mass” in society. During the 1960s, all of these activities were necessary for the growth of the Black Panther Party. But what we lack – and what they had — is a uniting theoretical message. We must foster unity while working together to build a popular movement. This unity must come with accountability to each other.

To counter the email that I received, I’m putting a call out for “solidarity” with working class people and asking for “emergency funds” to build an anarchist movement. This it to defend and aid those harmed most during this recession and by the state. It’s time to be serious about anarchism.

While I understand that one of the anarchists arrested in Asheville lived in Chicago for three years, and that many recognize him as a comrade, we have to be critical of our actions and theories. We must strive to be reflective in our practice. No matter how close those people are to us, their actions as individuals are not necessarily in our interests as a movement. I hope that this article challenges anarchists to think about their approach (or lack of it) to movement-building, and to create productive ideas for new directions.

Please check out the Four Star Anarchist Organization for other great articles

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Time To Party Like It’s 1999!!!

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Time To Party Like It's 1999

New Poster Art by Mike Flugennock: “Spirit Of ’99” Promotes Seattle/WTO

Anniversary Events in DC

Holy shit, has it really been ten years already? Phew, now that really
makes me feel old. Luckily for me, fiftysomething is the new
thirtysomething…or something.

So, when I was asked to design the poster for the Seattle/WTO Tenth
Anniversary event here in DC, there was only one thing to do — another
parody of a famous work of art, in this case, a classic of Kitsch
Americana, Archibald Willard’s iconic Spirit Of ’76, the hit of the show
at the 1876 Columbian Exposition.

But, aaa-aaaanyway…the big do is on:

Monday, November 30, at Chief Ike’s in Adam’s Morgan, 1725 Columbia Road NW, at 7pm.

It’s a fund raiser for the Washington Peace Center and the Funk The War Alumni Association (for all you ex-college kids who are too old for SDS, but still want to get funky). There’ll be the obligatory drinking and
party-mix grooves, of course. There’ll also be some vintage Seattle/WTO
rebellion video running, because we really loves us some anarchy.

Other events that weekend include panel discussions, for those of you
into sitting around and listening to people talk.

Here’s the download URLs, for all you wheatpasters out there. Don’t wait
around for the Lamppost Liberation Front’s official release announcement
from our Minister Of Information, because…well, because that just
wouldn’t be anarchistic:

Medium-res jpg image, color, 1mb

Medium-res jpg image, grayscale, 792k

So, hit the copy shop, mix up the paste, grab your rollers, and hit the
streets, kids!

Yer pal, Mike Flugennock
Minister Of Arts And Culture, Liberty Lamppost Liberation Front

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