Tag Archives: steven mcnallen

Happy Fifth Anniversary, have some lulz!

Happy Birthday To Us!

Happy Birthday To Us!

This marks the fifth year of Lady Liberty’s Lamp, and we’re glad you’ve been with us for this long. We’re especially thankful to all of the hare-brained trolls who have provided us bucketloads of side-splitting laughs. So, for this landmark anniversary, let’s take a look at one of the funnier half-wits to darken our towels.

Say hello to Joe Alice Daves of Kirkland, Arizona. Joe believes he’s a “libertarian heathen” and has some very mean things to say about us! Let’s take a look at this stirring, erudite skewering of a few our posts. Or not. We’ll keep his spelling and formatting intact, for added flavor. If you’re wondering why paying attention to this nobody, we’re highlighting him as a typical Asatru Folk Assembly apologist– sure, the spelling might be a little different, but the arguments are the same. Almost as if they’re all reading off a script.

I know the post is over a year old, but it took me this long to formulate a response

Translation: I know the post is over a year old, but it took me this long to formulate a response

Direct from his failure of a blog!

 

the liberty lamp blog has to my knowledge done two posts on Steve and the AFA these are both filled with hate speech and ridiculous arguments against us.

 

Oh boy. Someone isn’t familiar with the concept of a “repost.” Circle Ansuz is the author of the posts in question. We just added our own comments. Ridiculous arguments? You mean evidence backed up by comprehensive citations and sources? Dear me, must be that whole “reality has a liberal bias” thing again. Drat!

first both posts begin with images of Nazi symbolism a cheap stunt to shock and horrify their readers ,

And this person can’t read a caption either. I mean, if someone makes a post about subject X, then posts a picture of subject X and adds a caption referencing subject X, they certainly must be completely unrelated and only posted for shock value. If it walks like a duck and talks like a duck– well, it must be a refrigerator.

second they attempt to use arrogance and “logic” to argue against the theory of meta genetics and genetic memory here is one example when referring to another article they posted the link to “Details McNallen’s goofy theories on why the souls of white people are incompatible with people of other races, as if they are distinct species”

Wait! That’s point two? You mean that complaining about the fact that you can’t understand how an old cult obsessed with racial spiritualism is related to a new cult obsessed with racial spiritualism constitutes “point one?” This is the type of mental athlete that the AFA sports as its champions? Sigh.

But why did you leave off the bit about how McNallen was an ardent, foaming supporter of South African death squads? Are you ashamed of your cult leader’s past? Tsk tsk, such disobedience means you’ll get half your serving of gruel for dinner! But enough of that– is there any actual refutation of what Circle Ansuz laid out? You know, any proof that Steven McNallen didn’t actually say those things that he actually said? No? This isn’t a refutation or a rebuttal, this is you being dense.

and another ” he quite literally believes that the souls of different races are as incompatible as an Allen wrench to a flat-head screw”

Yes, that’s right, that’s the whole concept of “aryans” not being able to be reincarnated as “non aryans.” Where’s the rebuttal or refutation?

you can not argue against a religious belief you either believe in or you don’t ( I think human history should have taught us that by now )

Eh?

Uh, no.

Wait, what? I can’t even parse this properly. Do you mean to say that it is not possible to argue against a religious belief that you do or do not believe in, or do you mean to say that arguing against a religious belief is impossible in and of itself? In either case, there are millennia of atheist philosophers who stridently disagree. Lest I be penalized for engaging in a straw-man argument, I’ll take your argument as written: How did history prove that it is impossible to argue against a religious belief? You have never actually provided any evidence to support this claim. Of course, this whole statement is preposterous– any subject can be argued. Refusing to accept the existence of those arguments doesn’t make them go away, it weakens your own position to a point where the only thing propping up your tissue of lies is the blind fervor of your adherents. Force is no substitute for intellect. This head-in-the-sand approach seems to be pretty typical of AFA apologists.

and sounding condensed to get people to agree with you is a older cheat stunt then propaganda.

Did you mean “condescending?” We only do that because it’s funny to laugh at people who are so desperately trying to push half-baked racist puffery about how non-whites are genetically incapable of being as spiritually “advanced” as “pure whites.” If there’s anyone more deserving of mockery and derision than the people trying to build a new Thule Society, it’s the people who act as feeble apologists for these crackpots. People like you.

third if different races evolved to look differently then why would they not be spiritual different as well ( see doesn’t sound so goofy does it?)

This makes as much sense as the idiotic creationist trope of “if man evolved from monkeys, why are there still monkeys?” You’re making a straw man argument. There are spiritual differences between cultures, and there are significant similarities– but this isn’t the position of the AFA, and you know that. The position of the AFA is that non-whites are incompatible with “white spirituality.” This isn’t a question of whether or not different cultures have different religious practices, we’re talking about how the AFA perpetuates the notion that Europeans have a homogenous monoculture through the asinine theory that “white” people are genetically and spiritually incompatible with other races– as if we’re talking about dogs and fish interbreeding. The mixed race female cosplayers on your facebook page can attest to the fallacy of your position.

fourth they make many other bigoted comments against us

“Waah, someone’s being mean to me on the internet! I’m going to call them a bigot because it sounds good even though I have no idea what the word actually means!” Have we or Circle Ansuz ever made any derrogatory statements about heathens, pagans or non-christian religions? Of course not. We make derrogatory statements about racist piles of shit who are trying to legitimize their backwards, paranoid and intellectually bankrupt desires for race wars under the guise of spirituality, as if having a minority religious belief is a magical shield against criticism. It’s not “bigotry” to point out that your spiritual leader thought that killing people for fun and profit was a jolly good idea, nor is it “hate speech” to expose links between someone trying to act squeaky clean and neo-nazi groups– these are things called “facts.” We’re sorry that you’re offended by the ugly truth.

like this one “every time we’ve probed this disturbing tendency within the pagan scene, we’ve hit brick walls, hostility or half-assed weasel-worded apologies and excuses. The most common excuse we’ve heard was the “in the spirit of Frith, we don’t speak ill of our brothers and sisters in the heathen community.” Excuse me? There’s a loathsome, glad-handing, grinning creature wriggling under the skin of your community and you claim you’re either unwilling or unable to talk about his batshit-crazy racial theories because it will upset people? To niflhel with that
garbage.”

This isn’t what “bigoted” means.
you-keep-using-that-word1

FRITH IS MUCH MORE THEN NOT WANTING TO “UPSET PEOPLE” IT IS ABOUT LOYALTY TO OUR FOLK DO NOT CALL OUR BELIEFS HALF ASSED WEASEL WORDS OR GARBAGE.

So “loyalty to your folk” means apologizing for and covering up a racist scam artist? It means crushing dissent and flinging the terms “racist” and “bigot” at anyone who dares question your litany of deceit? It means unquestioningly swallowing demonstrable hogwash in the mistaken belief that ideological purity and subservience to a deranged fool with a Napoleon complex is the path to spiritual liberation? Hey man, if you don’t want people classifying your dearly held beliefs as a bunch of racist garbage, it might help for you to, you know, distance yourself from racist garbage. Unless you actually are a racist pile of shit– in which case you should stop being such a vile coward and admit it. At least the goose-stepping idiots with uniform fetishes are proud to admit that they’re racist buffoons.

these are hate filled arguments and false claims of racism against us another example when they refer to the AFA and steve as and i quote “the cancerous sludge known as the Asatru Folk Assembly and McNallen himself”
in conclusion this is just hate speech if you want to learn about the AFA go to rune stone.com

Sometimes a picture says a thousand words.

Sometimes a picture says a thousand words.

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Stephen McNallen and the Asatru Folk Assembly: Racist Heathenry

Another "heathen" society obsessed with racial spiritualism.

Another “heathen” society obsessed with racial spiritualism.

We can’t begin to describe how overjoyed we are with Circle Ansuz’s deconstruction of Stephen McNallen and the AFA. Like we said before, every time we’ve probed this disturbing tendency within the pagan scene, we’ve hit brick walls, hostility or half-assed weasel-worded apologies and excuses. The most common excuse we’ve heard was the “in the spirit of Frith, we don’t speak ill of our brothers and sisters in the heathen community.” Excuse me? There’s a loathsome, glad-handing, grinning creature wriggling under the skin of your community and you claim you’re either unwilling or unable to talk about his batshit-crazy racial theories because it will upset people? To niflhel with that garbage.

To that end, Circle Ansuz has produced a stunning amount of information about the cancerous sludge  known as the Asatru Folk Assembly and McNallen himself. So much so, in fact, that we can’t republish it here without the posts becoming ungainly. They’ve completed their expose on McNallen and the AFA, so we’re going to link to each and every one of their articles in this post. The web of deceit spun by McNallen and the hordes of sycophants he’s bred specifically for the purpose of deflecting criticism are wide and vast, so it takes a long series such as this to fully dissect them all.

Stephen McNallen and Racialist Asatru Part 1: Metagenetics and the South Africa Connection
-Details McNallen’s goofy theories on why the souls of white people are incompatible with people of other races, as if they are distinct species. Also goes into McNallen’s time being a fanboy of a South African death squad.

Stephen McNallen and Racialist Asatru Part 2: The Roots of Racialized Religion
-Shows the historical movements that McNallen’s AFA draws its inspiration from, and how the AFA’s philosophy is interchangeable and complimentary with its preceeding, overtly racist forebears.

Stephen McNallen and Racialist Asatru Part 3: In His Own Words
-McNallen opining that all illegals immigrants need to be immediately deported to Mexico, his weasely comments about when AFA members were spotted at the racist National Policy Institute conference in 2011, and why he supports the white supremacist lie of “global white genocide.”

Stephen McNallen Part 4: Stella Natura and What Can be Done
-McNallen’s involvement with the Stella Natura festival and profiles of some of the more vile white supremacist acts, with a special focus on the violent white supremacist Robert N. Taylor, of the act Changes.

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Stephen McNallen and Racialist Asatru

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There is an amusing tendency amongst religious and racist frauds of all stripes to boast about their academic prowess as a way of adding legitimacy to their philosophies, while simultaneously exercising shockingly poor academic ethics. A typical example of this are people who claim their particular religious tradition is thousands of years old but are unwilling and unable to produce one shred of evidence as proof. This generally manifests itself in situations commonly reserved for TV preachers and other hucksters who want your money. This also comes into play with racists who spout ridiculous, quasi-scientific theories with their citations consisting of routinely discredited studies or papers that mysteriously can’t be found.

In Steven McNallen, we have the perfect synthesis of all of the above elements. We’ve been smelling the racist stench from McNallen for years, but every time we’ve probed our local heathen communities for comments or insights, we’ve met with nothing but brick walls. Circle Ansuz, an anti-fascist heathen collective who’s been the perennial foe of the idiotic “bay area national anarchists,” has written a fantastic piece that truly demolishes the mythology around McNallen. As you’ll find out, McNallen isn’t a quaint “racialist” who thinks that different races can live peacefully separate from each other, he quite literally believes that the souls of different races are as incompatible as an Allen wrench to a flat-head screw. Oh, and he tagged along with and wrote fawning articles about a mercenary outfit composed of former members of apartheid South Africa’s official government death squad.

From Circle Ansuz:

Stephen McNallen is, without a doubt, one of the most famous names in American Heathenry.  A long-time participant, organizer, and writer in American Asatru McNallen has been active since the early 70s when he helped found the Asatru Free Assembly.  Following the organization’s collapse over the issue of racism he traveled the world, writing for Soldier of Fortune magazine, before founding the Asatru Folk Assembly in 1994.  Since then he has led the AFA to becoming a large, well-known, and established element in the American Heathen community.  So great is his influence and fame that many say he is the most important man in American Heathenry.  His proponents claim, quite loudly, that without McNallen Heathenry would not exist in the United States.

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The story is very powerful, compelling, and is a carefully crafted myth.  Stephen McNallen, far from being the messianic figure he is held up as, has for some time been an active participant in the American neo-fascist radical traditionalist movement.  It is not certain how long he has been involved in the neo-fascist movement but what is certain is since at least 1985 he has been an unapologetic advocate for white nationalism.  Far worse, he has actively worked to advance his brand of Heathenry by concealing it behind an appealing mask of twisted heritage and falsified traditions.  The damage he has done to American Heathenry is incalculable.

It is not clear when McNallen first subscribed to racialist practice but the first proof we have of him articulating such a position is from 1985 and the time of the Asatru Free Assembly.  During the 70s and 80s the old AFA, as it is known, was kicked off by a dispute over what to do about a kindred in Arizona who included open neo-Nazis.   The debate steadily split the AFA into two camps: those who supported excluding those from the community who were not of proven Germanic descent and those who welcomed all interested seekers.  The tensions of the debate would lead to the AFA dissolving sometime between 1986 and 1987.  As the schism in the Asatru Free Assembly Stephen was gaining momentum McNallen would write and publish the document that would be the foundation of his form of Heathen practice: Metagenetics.

In “Metagenetics” McNallen lays out his case for racialized, ethnocentric spirituality.  He begins by saying:

One of the most controversial tenets of Asatru is our insistence that ancestry matters- that there are spiritual and metaphysical implications to heredity, and that we are thus a religion not for all of humanity, but rather one that calls only its own. This belief of ours has led to much misunderstanding, and as aresult some have attempted to label us as “racist”, or have accused us of fronting for totalitarian political forms.
He proceeds to lay out his case proving the link between genetics and spirituality.  McNallen claims these ideas are based on, “intuitive insights as old as our people” but then proceeds to cite no sagas, sources, or examples to back this claim up.  The closest he gets is when he claims reincarnation by bloodline was a universal belief among the ancient Germanics saying, “A person did not come back as a bug or a rabbit, or as a person of another race or tribe, but as a member of their own clan.” (emphasis ours) After citing Carl Jung as justification for his theories McNallen asserts, “A more precise statement of the mind/body/spirit link, and of the religious implications of biological kinship, would be hard to find,” before concluding:
No doubt, on an earlier and deeper level of psychic development, where it is still impossible to distinguish between an Aryan, Semitic,Hamitic, or Mongolian mentality, all human races have a common collective psyche. But with the beginning of racial differentiation, essential differences are developed in the collective psyche as well. For this reason, we cannot transplant the spirit of a foreign religion ‘in globo’ into our own mentality without sensible injury to the latter.”
The only support he has to validate his arguments is an uncited study on Tlingit spirituality.  The lack of properly cited sources, surprising given McNallen’s college education and his years of service as a 2nd Lieutenant in the US Army in Germany, only serves to bolster and legitimize an overtly racist argument.  He puts it most clearly and obviously when he says in his closing paragraph, “only by

understanding who we are, only by coming from our racial “center”, can we interact justly and with wisdom with other peoples on this planet”.  Regardless of one’s opinions regarding his logic, methodology, sourcing, or position it is clear since at least 1985, when he published Metagenetics, McNallen stood unquestionably for racialist Heathenry.

In the years following the dissolution of the old AFA and the founding of the Ring of the Troth Stephen McNallen traveled the world, particularly in South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana, as a writer for Soldier of Fortune magazine.

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One piece he published was in the May 1995 issue covering the notorious mercentary outfit Executive Outcomes, one of the first modern private mercenary corporations.

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The byline for the article McNallen introduces them with, “If you are willing to occasionally fire up a few friends from a long-time, pro-Western, anti-communist guerrilla group, Executive Outcomes is looking for a few good mercs.”  The true story behind Executive Outcomes is much less glamorous than this implies.  Founded in 1989 by former Lt. Colonel Eeben Barlow of the South Africa Defense Force’s infamous Civil Cooperation Bureau, an apartheid-era government hit squad, Barlow took advantage of the downsizing of the SADF to recruit now unemployed veterans & special forces operators to form the backbone of his new business venture.  EO would do the dirty work for corporate interests all over Africa until their dissolution in 1999.

McNallen’s time in South Africa would have a profound impact on his form of racialized Heathenry.  When he returned to the United States in 1994 from his travels abroad and founded the Asatru Folk Assembly, he began promoting many concepts central to Afrikaner nationalism as if they are inseparable from Asatru itself.

Continued in Part Two on Monday, August 26th

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